The Washington Post Features Huda Fahmy and “Huda F Cares?”

Fahmy recently published her second YA fictionalized graphic memoir, “Huda F Cares?,” which has been shortlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. The book follows an observant Muslim family on a road trip to Disney World.

The Washington Post Features Huda Fahmy and “Huda F Cares?”
Hena Khan (left) and Huda Fahmy (right) are two well-known Muslim American authors within the KidLit community.

Yesterday, Muslim American author Hena Khan interviewed her fellow Muslim American author Huda Fahmy for The Washington Post. Both authors are known for writing children’s books: Khan primarily writes books for an audience of middle grade and younger, while Fahmy focuses on graphic novels for both young adult (YA) and adult audiences.

Fahmy recently published her second YA fictionalized graphic memoir, “Huda F Cares?” The book is a follow-up to the highly praised “Huda F Are You?” and is a finalist for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. "Huda F Cares?" follows an observant Muslim family on a road trip to Disney World, where siblings squabble, stand up for each other and discover that sisters truly are forever.

While many pieces of “Huda F Are You?” are fictionalized, the book draws its emotional beats from its author’s lived experiences. In conversation with Publishers Weekly, Fahmy said she chose to focus her graphic novel on a younger audience because she think it’s important for young readers who are first generation or children of immigrants to have characters they can relate to.

In a written interview for The Washington Post, Fahmy discussed “Huda F Are You?” with Khan. The interview covers topics like the titular character’s embarrassment over praying in public, humor as a tool to challenge boundaries and similarities — and differences — between Huda the character and Huda the author.

Fahmy is an Egyptian American author and artist known for her webcomic series "Yes, I'm Hot in This,"  which explores the experiences and challenges of being a Muslim woman living in the United States. Originally an English teacher, Fahmy began writing about her experiences as a hijab-wearing Muslim woman in America before her older sister encouraged her to turn her stories into comics.

Khan was first published in 2008 and has been writing ever since. Her books include the bestselling novel "Amina’s Voice", as well as "More to the Story," an adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” featuring a Pakistani American Muslim family. Her upcoming book "Drawing Deena," a story of a young artist’s struggles with anxiety, is set to publish on Feb. 6, 2024. Khan previously spoke to Fann about writing for children and her love for “Little Women.”

You can read Fahmy and Khan’s full conversation in The Washington Post at the link below.

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