18th Tasveer Film Festival Lineup Announced

This year, TSAFF became the first-ever Oscar-qualifying South Asian film festival, which allows honored films to vie for Academy Awards recognition. This status underscores its international acclaim, dedication to authentic South Asian narratives and support for diverse filmmakers.

The poster for the 18th Tasveer Film Festival
The festival places a spotlight on South Asian filmmakers, striving to carry out a mission of stimulating thinking and social change through South Asian creativity.

Last week, the Tasveer Film Festival announced the program lineup for their 18th annual festival. The festival will take place from Oct. 12 - 22, and will include 83 films from 11 countries, featuring 26 languages, 33 films with female directors and a staggering 25 world premieres. Excitingly, this year marks the festival's first year as an Oscar-qualifying festival.

The first Tasveer Film Festival (also known as Tasveer South Asian Film Festival, or TSAFF) took place in 2004 as part of TSAFF’s mission to “inspire social change through films, art and storytelling.” Since then, the Tasveer Film Festival has been a stalwart champion of South Asian cinema, dedicated to amplifying under-represented voices. It spotlights South Asian filmmakers and fosters social change through films, Q&As, panels and workshops, leaving a transformative impact on attendees.

This year, TSAFF became the first-ever Oscar-qualifying South Asian film festival, which allows honored films to vie for Academy Awards recognition. This status underscores its international acclaim, dedication to authentic South Asian narratives and support for diverse filmmakers. It serves as a global platform for cross-cultural understanding, elevating its visibility and profile.

This new recognition allows South Asian filmmakers to compete for Oscars in a streamlined way, breaking reliance on major festivals, which often restrict visibility and screening opportunities for South Asian films. It aligns with TSAFF's mission of celebrating cultural diversity and nurturing cross-cultural dialogue through cinema, while expanding opportunities for South Asian filmmakers on the world stage.

At least 10 Muslim filmmakers are expected to showcase their work at the festival, including Mahnoor Euceph, whose short “Eid Mubarak” has the prestigious honor of closing out the festival. The film follows a privileged 6-year-old Pakistani girl who embarks on a mission to save her beloved pet goat from being eaten on Eid al-Azha, only to learn the meaning of sacrifice.

The festival will take place in person in Seattle, WA, and will also sell tickets virtually. You can watch the trailer for the festival below.

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